Copyright infringement and the IARDC

On of the issues in my case is the massive copyright infringment of hundred of pages of my blog.

So, of interest is the following case:

In this particular case, Princeton Review had to pay $52,000 for its continued use of copyrighted SAT test questions and agree to a license agreement.  That’s after the defendant allegedly spent $600k in attorneys fees.  In addition, it’s founder, Mr. Katzman is banned from testing sites for 2 years since he allegedly took tests only with the intent to copy them and use them in his own buiness.

http://www.nytimes.com/1987/12/24/us/accord-ends-sat-copyright-infringement-suit.html

Another interesting case is Castle Rock Entertainment Inc. v. Carol Publishing Group, 150 F.3d 132 (2nd Cir. 1998), was a U.S. copyright infringement case involving the popular American sitcom Seinfeld. Some U.S. copyright law courses use the case to illustrate modern application of the fair use doctrine. The United States Court of Appeals for the Second Circuit upheld a lower court’s summary judgment that the defendant had committed copyright infringement. The decision is noteworthy for classifying Seinfeld trivia not as unprotected facts, but as protectable expression. The court also rejected the defendant’s fair use defense finding that any transformative purpose possessed in the derivative work was “slight to non-existent” under the Supreme Court ruling in Campbell v. Acuff-Rose Music, Inc., 510 U.S. 569 (1994). (from Wiki article)

From Law360: a college test company in Texas had to pay the SAT people $1 million to settle an infringement suit.

http://www.law360.com/articles/54706/college-board-settles-copyright-suit-over-sat-exam

Apparently test questions are a hot bed of litigation.  Just taking some of those questions with permission or a license agreement can get a company into some real hot water.  So the real question is, why do these companies take such as risk? Many are online companies, but you would think they would find a online website (like mine) that explains JUST SAY NO TO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT.

JoAnne

In yet another case,

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